Wednesday, 27 January 2016

Snooze, You Lose: Five Tips to Start the Day Well By Bradley Busch

Man waking up to alarm clock

Getting a good night’s sleep is vital for health and happiness, improving our memory, mood and immune system. But did you know how you wake up is also important?
That’s because when you wake up your body goes through certain changes (as shown in the video below) to help you feel fresh for the upcoming day: your body temperature increases, your sleep becomes lighter and hormones, such as dopamine and cortisol, are released.
But if you do certain things (hit your snooze button or get dressed in the dark, for example) this cycle can be affected and as a result your energy, alertness and concentration in the morning can suffer. So what can you do to ensure you start the day well?

You snooze you lose

By pressing the snooze button, you disrupt your natural sleep pattern and, instead of preparing you to wake up, your body may start preparing itself to go back to sleep. This means that when your alarm goes off again, you may wake up feeling groggier and less refreshed. Research suggests this feeling can last for more than two hours after waking up.
Try moving your alarm clock further away so that you have to get out of bed to turn it off. Another good way to avoid the snooze button is to plan your sleep/wakeup time more effectively. People sleep in 90-minute cycles, so if you plan backwards, you can set your bedtime to coincide with this, ensuring that you wake up at the right time, feeling refreshed and not tempted to stay in bed.
Worried that you won’t be able to kick your snooze habit? You can take advantage of your lack of self-control by downloading this rather nifty app that donates £1 to your favourite charity each time you hit snooze. You may not feel more awake, but at least you’ll be doing some good while you lie in bed.

Here comes the sun

Repeat after me: do not get ready in the dark. Your body’s internal clock, known as your circadian rhythm, is linked to light and darkness. This has evolutionary roots; we hunted in the day and rested or hid from predators we could not see in the dark at night. This routine helped set our body clocks. We learned to wake up when it was light because this was when we could best maximise our environment and surroundings. If your exposure to light is altered, your body clock can shift, leaving you out of sync. This is known as a light phase response curve.
As well as regulating your body clock, sunlight also affects levels of the hormone serotonin, which is associated with wellbeing. The more light you enjoy, the better you will feel, so open your curtains and let in the sun.
Unfortunately, and especially in the winter months, this may not always make your room any lighter. Some people have taken to using an alarm clock that mimics dawn rising, by getting gradually lighter and lighter. This may not be to everyone taste, in which case, try to turn on your light soon after waking. You may not get all the benefits of getting natural light, but it is still better than getting ready in the dark.

Ask yourself good questions

How you talk to yourself has a big impact on how you feel and perform. One early morning strategy can involve asking yourself good questions such as, “What do I want to achieve today?”
In 2005, former Apple founder and chief executive, Steve Jobs, addressed the new graduates of Stanford University. His speech is one of the most viewed of the 21st century, and during it, he gave an insight into his daily waking up routine. He said: “For the past 33 years I have looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself, ‘If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?’ And whenever the answer has been ‘no’ for too many days in a row, I know something needs to change.”
This approach may not be appropriate for everyone, but it shows the impact that asking yourself questions can have. As well as helping you manage any nerves or self-doubt, asking yourself questions can also be motivating. One possible reason why this strategy is effective is because by asking yourself questions, your brain will automatically start searching for answers, acting as a call to action. So take heed of your inner narrative and start using it to your advantage.

Rise and dine

The gap between your evening meal and your first meal the next day is the longest your body goes without eating or drinking, yet many people regularly skip breakfast. Research suggests that students may learn this habit from their parents. Skipping breakfast often leads to people seeking high-calorie food later in the day.
The 10 minutes it takes to eat breakfast will benefit you more than that extra 10 minutes in bed. If running late, the temptation may be to use snacks or energy drinks as a replacement for traditional breakfasts. However, eating cereal has been shown to help people improve their concentration and memory over the course of a morning. This effect was not felt for energy drinks. This is because cereals that are rich in complex carbohydrates provide energy over the course of a whole morning, as opposed to high energy drinks which may offer a short burst but are followed by a large slump.

Get moving

Exercise has many known benefits,both physically and psychologically. Doing just a little exercise regularly can lower the risk of many major diseases (including coronary heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes), as well as improving your mood and self-esteem, and your ability to deal with stressful situations.
Exercising in the morning is good, as it is easy to put off being physically active by the time you get to the end of the day. An early morning workout can get your heart rate up and your blood flowing. You don’t need to do a full gym session. The NHS recommends walking at an intensity where you are still able to talk, but not sing the words to your favourite song.
In the long run, exercising helps fight feelings of fatigue, which will energise you during the day.

Tuesday, 26 January 2016

‘Motivated, creative and passionate’ – the words that kill your CV By Stefan Stern

Young woman having a job interview
It starts early these days – the boosterism, the upbeat personal statements. University applicants have to sell themselves on their Ucas forms. Social media accounts are dotted with self-promotion and self-congratulation. And professionals are filling up their LinkedIn pages with a series of overfamiliar claims.
If you believe what you read on LinkedIn, we are a nation of “motivated” and “creative” people. Everything is awesome, and everyone is “passionate” and “enthusiastic”. We are “driven”. We are “strategic”. We have a “track record” of “extensive experience”.
These are some of the most frequently used terms LinkedIn says are seen on its site. And of course they tell us nothing about anything. They are words that anyone can use. But if you have to say it, can it really be true? Why would you need to boast about your “integrity”, for example?
Dead words conveying limited meaning are a sign that something has gone wrong. First, it shows that in their insecurity about their job prospects, people feel obliged to make the same old empty claims. It betrays both a lack of imagination and a disappointing vocabulary. It also shows that many people have a narrow, stereotypical view of what they think employers want. Perhaps TV shows such as The Apprentice reinforce the idea that business is mainly about being “passionate”. Few approach the world of work with the blunt candour of Lester Burnham, played by Kevin Spacey in the film American Beauty, who said he was looking for “the least possible amount of responsibility”.
Why do we feel the need to make these predictable statements about ourselves when going for a job? It cannot really set us apart from the other applicants. But maybe the cliche-mongers are being cleverer than we think. The use of “applicant tracking systems” by many companies might tempt you to repeat the usual lines about being “energetic”, “dynamic” and so on. Of course, some recruiters will see no alternative to using software to help them get through thousands of applications. But more fool them if they set the algorithms up to create a shortlist of two dozen seemingly identical “driven” and “passionate” people.
Dead language reveals inert thinking. The Financial Times’ Lucy Kellaway scored a direct hit on the global consulting firm Deloitte this week by pointing out how dire the chief executive’s new year message to staff had been. The CEO, Punit Renjen, had said his New Year resolution was “to deliver an exceptional, and consistent, global talent experience across the Deloitte network”. Bosses who talk to their staff like that are asking for a mountain of identical, bland job applications to tumble onto their desk. The firm and the applicants deserve each other.
How can we break out of the business “buzzword bingo” trap? When in doubt,some of George Orwell’s rules on clarity and simplicity in writing are worth remembering: never use a metaphor, simile, or other figure of speech that you are used to seeing in print; never use a long word where a short one will do; if it is possible to cut a word out, always cut it out.
But more importantly, it ought to be possible to apply for a job without pretending to be something we are not. It shouldn’t be necessary to repeat a list of hackneyed workplace virtues. We should tell a potential employer who we are, in plain terms. If they are looking for someone like us, good. If not we will have avoided the unpleasant experience of getting stuck in a job that didn’t really suit us.
A performance bonus should go to LinkedIn for alerting people to their cliche-filled ways. But wait a minute. In revealing these overpopular words and phrases a spokesman for the company said: “It’s really important that people are authentic on their profiles.” Oh dear: “authentic” – a no-no in the job application and personal statement business. And it gets worse: “It’s never been more challenging to stand out from the crowd,” we are told. “Show individuality … treat LinkedIn as your professional portfolio …” LinkedIn: heal thyself.

Secondary Teaching Job of the Day!!

Are you a Science Teacher, looking for a February 2016 start in Tonbridge, Kent?


TimePlan Education, working in partnership with their client school, is looking for a science teacher who has taught successfully across key stage 3 and 4. The position is a part-time contract starting February 2016. The successful candidate must be committed to achieving high standards and able to inspire students across the ability range at KS3 and KS4.

The latest judgement by Ofsted Graded this 11-18 boys academy as "good" with outstanding behaviour. It has a very experienced leadership with the Headteacher and Chief Executive both being National Leaders of Education. The academy places a strong emphasis upon learning, teaching and outstanding behaviour which has been reflected in every Ofsted report since 2000. It is a warm and vibrant community which is first choice for parents partly because of its specialist status for maths and sport. Students are renowned for their success in extra-curricular sporting activities at local and national level.

To be considered for this science teaching vacancy based in Tonbridge , Kent you will need to;
  • show you are an imaginative and forward thinking classroom practitioner.
  • have the willingness to form part of a successful and enthusiastic team.
  • support the school ethos at all times during your working days.
  • possess excellent teaching skills and an ability to lead classes with pace and sufficient challenge.
It is essential that you understand the school's academic standing and have a sincere commitment to sharing long-term aims.
In return we offer:
  • professional classroom support from our team of headteacher consultants throughout the length of your contract.
  • a dedicated key contact at the TimePlan South East office.
  • TimePlan South East teacher socials where you can meet teachers who are teaching at schools in your placement area.
  • opportunities to aid your professional development.
  • pay to scale.
If you are interested in applying for this science teaching position in Tonbridge, Kent, Please apply online today or call on 01732 373340. TimePlan are the number one teaching agency for jobs in the south east.

Primary Teaching Job of the Day!!

Are you a Qualified Reception Teacher looking for an April 2016 start in Kent?

TimePlan Education, working in partnership with their client school, is looking for a reception teacher. The position is a full-time contract starting after Easter 2016. The successful candidate must be committed to achieving high standards and able to inspire students in their early years of school.

This is a large Primary Academy in Bexley, it is part of a large and successful federation of schools across south east London. This trust has a long history of providing outstanding education to the students it caters for. This Bexley Academy has a split primary and secondary school and works closely with the local community. The school is a specialist technology academy and has excellent and modern facilities for all students. There is less than a 30 minute commute into Central London. For drivers, the school is around 2 miles from the M25 and within a close distance to the A2.

To be considered for this reception teaching vacancy based in Kent you will need to:
  • show you are an imaginative and forward thinking classroom practitioner
  • have the willingness to form part of a successful and enthusiastic team
  • support the school ethos at all times
  • possess excellent teaching skills and an ability to lead classes with pace and sufficient challenge
It is essential that you understand the school's academic standing and have a sincere commitment to sharing long-term aims.

In return we offer:
  • professional classroom support from our team of headteacher consultants throughout the length of your contract.
  • a dedicated key contact at the TimePlan South East office.
  • TimePlan South East teacher socials where you can meet teachers who are teaching at schools in your placement area.
  • opportunities to aid your professional development.
  • pay to scale.
If you are interested in applying for this reception teaching position in Kent, please apply online today or call on 01732 373340.
TimePlan are the number one teaching agency for jobs in the south east.

Thursday, 21 January 2016

Congratulations to Dartford Grammar School in Kent Extract from Daily Mail By Mark Duell


In Kent: Dartford Grammar School had a 100 per cent rate of pupils achieved at least five A to C grades including English and maths last year, while the English Baccalaureate rate was 98 per centAn academy in London was today named the best school in England for GCSE and English Baccalaureate results.
Every girl at The Henrietta Barnett School achieved at least five A to C grades including English and maths last year, while it also had a 100 per cent pass rate for the English Baccalaureate.
The school in Hampstead, North London, was followed by Dartford Grammar School in Kent and Altrincham Grammar School for Girls near Manchester, which also had 100 per cent A-C pass rates


However they missed out on top spot due to pass rates for the English Baccalaureate (EBacc) at 98 per cent and 97 per cent respectively.
Meanwhile The Liverpool Blue Coat School finished in fourth place - with a 100 per cent score on GCSE A-Cs and 96 per cent on EBaccs - but had the highest average pupil points score of 696.1.
The figures also show that 88,000 more youngsters are taking the EBacc subjects of English, maths, science, a language and either history or geography, compared with 2010.
The strong performances were revealed as it also emerged that more than 250,000 children are not getting a decent education, including pupils at three of the Government's flagship free schools.



Secondary Teaching Job of the Day!!

Are you an English Teacher, looking for a February 2016 start in Herne Bay, Kent?

TimePlan Education, working in partnership with their client school, is looking for a English teacher who has taught successfully across key stage 3 and 4. The position is a full-time contract starting February 2016. The successful candidate must be committed to achieving high standards and able to inspire students across the ability range at KS3 and KS4.

A secondary school and sixth form for boys and girls is situated in a lovely seaside town in North Kent. The age range of the pupils is 11-18. Judged to be outstanding by OfSTED it is a rapidly growing school with 1500 pupils. Firm discipline support from senior teachers who are committed to good standards & supportive staff.

To be considered for this English teaching vacancy based in Herne Bay, Kent you will need to;
  • show you are an imaginative and forward thinking classroom practitioner.
  • have the willingness to form part of a successful and enthusiastic team.
  • support the school ethos at all times during your working days.
  • possess excellent teaching skills and an ability to lead classes with pace and sufficient challenge.
It is essential that you understand the school's academic standing and have a sincere commitment to sharing long-term aims.
In return we offer:
  • professional classroom support from our team of headteacher consultants throughout the length of your contract.
  • a dedicated key contact at the TimePlan South East office.
  • TimePlan South East teacher socials where you can meet teachers who are teaching at schools in your placement area.
  • opportunities to aid your professional development.
  • pay to scale.
If you are interested in applying for this English teaching position in Herne Bay, Kent, Please apply online today or call on 01732 373340. TimePlan are the number one teaching agency for jobs in the south east.

Primary Teaching Job of the Day !!

Are you a Qualified Year 1 Teacher looking for a February 2016 start in Sussex?

TimePlan Education, working in partnership with their client school, is looking for a year 1 teacher who has taught successfully across key stage 1. The position is a full-time contract starting February 2016 and running until the summer break initially. The successful candidate must be committed to achieving high standards and able to inspire students across the ability range at KS1.

This 1 form entry primary school is very close to the exciting city of Brighton and Hove and boasts a happy, secure and caring environment where their students can blossom. This primary school is all inclusive and provides additional support and counselling for those learners who need it.
The school demands a high expectation from their students and teachers alike and aims to meet all the needs of the students by providing an enriched curriculum.
There is a lovely family atmosphere here where staff along with students enjoy working and learning closely together.

To be considered for this year 1 teaching vacancy based in Sussex you will need to:
  • show you are an imaginative and forward thinking classroom practitioner
  • have the willingness to form part of a successful and enthusiastic team
  • support the school ethos
  • possess excellent teaching skills and an ability to lead classes with pace and sufficient challenge
It is essential that you understand the school's academic standing and have a sincere commitment to sharing long-term aims

In return we offer:
  • professional classroom support from our team of headteacher consultants throughout the length of your contract.
  • a dedicated key contact at the TimePlan South East office.
  • TimePlan South East teacher socials where you can meet teachers who are teaching at schools in your placement area.
  • opportunities to aid your professional development.
  • pay to scale.
If you are interested in applying for this year 1 teaching position in Sussex, please apply online today or call on 01732 373 340.
TimePlan are the number one teaching agency for jobs in the south east.

Whitstable Oyster Festival 2016 Taken from official website

About the Festival

We are really proud to be part of such a long running cultural institution in our seaside town and are looking forward to welcoming friends old and new.
Here at WOF HQ, we feel that oyster festival is so much more than that – it isn't just a festival, it's the ultimate staycation for visitors from near and far, old and young. It's holidaying the way our grandparents used to.
We have two new exciting additions to the festival this year – The Shuck, our very own showcase restaurant, bar and performance venue - and The Oyster Bed, a family campsite overlooking the bay. The Shuck and camping tickets are on sale and are going fast, so don't let yourself be disappointed.
Whitstable is beautiful and there are events across the town throughout the festival week, with many of them free. There are lively restaurants, bars, a swimming pool and bowling alley and of course our stunning stretch of beaches. Take the opportunity to fly a kite, watch the fireworks from the Old Neptune or build a grotter – there is something for everyone.
We look forward to seeing you here this summer !

Wednesday, 20 January 2016

Secondary School Job of the Day !!

Are you a Chemistry Teacher, looking for a January 2016 start in Tonbridge, Kent?
TimePlan Education, working in partnership with their client school, is looking for achemistry teacher who has taught successfully across Key Stage 3, 4 and 5. The position is a full time contract starting January 2016. A successful candidate must be committed to achieving high standards and able to inspire students across the ability range at KS3, KS4 and KS5.
The school is an outstanding west Kent grammar school which is in the top 1% of schools nationally. It has about 1100 students, where staff are fully committed to the development of every individual in a stimulating, safe and friendly environment in which students are valued and may thrive intellectually, emotionally and physically.
To be considered for this chemistry teaching vacancy based in Tonbridge, Kent you will need to;
  • Show you are an imaginative and forward thinking classroom practitioner.
  • Have the willingness to form part of a successful and enthusiastic team.
  • Support the school ethos at all times during your working days.
  • Possess excellent teaching skills and an ability to lead classes with pace and sufficient challenge.
It is essential that you understand the schools academic standing and have a sincere commitment to sharing long-term aims.
In return we offer:
  • Professional classroom support from our team of Headteacher consultants throughout the length of your contract.
  • A dedicated Key Contact at the TimePlan South East office.
  • TimePlan South East teacher socials where you can meet teachers who are teaching at schools in your placement area.
  • Opportunities to aid your professional development.
  • Pay to scale.
If you are interested in applying for this chemistry teaching position in Tonbridge, Kent please apply online today or call on 01732 373340, TimePlan the number one teaching agency for jobs in the south east.

Primary Teaching Job of the Day !!

Are you an Assistant Head Teacher with Classroom experience looking for a January 2016 start in Bexley?

TimePlan Education, working in partnership with their client school, is looking for an assistant head teacher who has also taught successfully in a primary setting. The position is a full-time contract starting January 2016 and running until the summer term initially. The successful candidate must be committed to achieving high standards and able to inspire students across all ability ranges.

This Bexley primary school values are Achievement, Responsibility, Respect and Happiness. These values underpin the school and help create an ethos with commitment to succeed, care for others and enjoyment at the core. It welcomes children from the age of 3 upwards. The school is a two form entry and is located less than 20 minutes from a mainline station that has routes from Central London. The school has many awards, such as 'Healthy School' and 'Eco School' that reflect its commitment to promoting healthy lifestyles and environmental awareness.

To be considered for this assistant head teacher vacancy based in Bexley you will need to;
  • show you are an imaginative and forward thinking classroom practitioner.
  • have the willingness to form part of a successful and enthusiastic team.
  • support the school ethos at all times during your working days.
  • possess excellent teaching skills and an ability to lead classes with pace and sufficient challenge.
It is essential that you understand the school's academic standing and have a sincere commitment to sharing long-term aims.

In return we offer:
  • professional classroom support from our team of headteacher consultants throughout the length of your contract.
  • a dedicated key contact at the TimePlan South East office.
  • TimePlan South East teacher socials where you can meet teachers who are teaching at schools in your placement area.
  • opportunities to aid your professional development.
  • pay to scale.
If you are interested in applying for this assistant head teacher position in Bexley, please apply online today or call on 01732 373340.

TimePlan are the number one teaching agency for jobs in the south east.

Sissinghurst Castle Garden - International Garden Photographer of the Year Exhibition

If you are looking for something to do in Kent take a look at this photography exhibition at the beautiful castle ground!

Enjoy stunning photos on show at Sissinghurst this winter. Booking Not Needed.
A National Trust Event - Gates open 10:45. Start 11:00. End 17:00. General Admission Prices Apply. Please meet in the Oast.

For more details please phone the contact number below.
Sissinghurst Castle Garden, Sissinghurst, Biddenden Road, near Cranbrook, Kent TN17 2AB
Saturday 16 Jan 2016 to Sunday 28 Feb 2016

Tuesday, 19 January 2016

Penguin Ditches Degree Requirement for Job Applicants By Sally Weale

Global publishing group Penguin Random House will no longer require candidates for new jobs to have a university degree, it has announced.
The company said it wanted to open up opportunities to attract more varied candidates into publishing, an industry that has been criticised for its lack of diversity.
Penguin Random House human resources director Neil Morrison said that growing evidence shows there is no simple correlation between having a degree and future professional success.
The move comes just months after accountancy firm Ernst & Young, one of Britain’s biggest graduate recruiters, made a similar announcement, saying in August that it would no longer consider degree or A-level results when assessing potential employees.
And last May, Pricewaterhouse Coopers announced plans to ditch A-level results when recruiting graduates because of the unfair advantage given to independent school pupils.
Morrison said: “We want to attract the best people to help grow and shape the future of our company, regardless of their background – and that means that we need to think and act differently. Simply, if you’re talented and you have potential, we want to hear from you. This is the starting point for our concerted action to make publishing far, far more inclusive than it has been to date. Now, we need to be more visible to talented people across the UK.
“We believe this is critical to our future: to publish the best books that appeal to readers everywhere, we need to have people from different backgrounds with different perspectives and a workforce that truly reflects today’s society.”
Penguin Random House said it hoped to send a clear message: that graduates were still welcome to apply; that the university they attended would not affect their chance of success; and that not having a degree would no longer preclude a candidate from getting a job.

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/jan/18/penguin-ditches-the-need-for-job-seekers-to-have-university-degrees

Secondary School Job of the Day !!

Science Teacher required with an immediate start
Full time science teaching job in Folkestone, Kent. TimePlan Education, is working in partnership with their client school, who are looking for an experienced Science teacher who has taught successfully across Key Stage 3, 4 and Key Stage 5. The position is a full time contract startingimmediately. The successful candidate must be committed toachieving high standards and able to inspire students across the full ability range.
This Academy on the Kent coast specialises in Art, Media and European Culture. They have been identified by Kent County Council as its Centre of Excellence in Media and the Creative Arts. Located by the sea in a traditional coastal town, this academy has excellent transport links. They have the very latest in facilities including; outstanding ICT facilities including laptop computers with wireless Internet access in all classrooms; interactive whiteboards in all classrooms; specialist facilities in every subject area; 9 science labs; 8 specialist rooms for art textiles and graphics; dance, drama and recording studios; post production suite; 4 music rooms and 6 music practice rooms; large and flexible performance space; sports hall with viewing gallery and retractable assembly seating for 800 pupils; hard play areas and all weather pitch; playing fields, cricket pitch and running track; The Park; indoor recreational space for all pupils; vocational training suites.
This Science teaching vacancy based in Folkestone, Kent requires an applicant who is able offer the following:
Experience of teaching Science to KS3, KS4and KS5
Delivering good and outstanding teaching practices as the norm
A willingness to form part of a successful and enthusiastic team
Creating an enriching, supportive and high performing learning environment
Supporting the school ethos at all times during your working days
You will be an imaginative and forward thinking classroom practitioner
You will possess excellent teaching skills and an ability to lead classes with pace and sufficient challenge.
It is essential that you understand the schools academic standing and have a sincere commitment to sharing long-term aims.
In return we offer:
Pay to scale
Professional classroom support from our team of Headteacher Consultants throughout the length of your contract
A dedicated Key Contact at the south east office
TimePlan South East teacher socials where you can meet professional teachers from all over the planet who are teaching at schools in your placement area
Opportunities to aid your professional development.
If you are interested in applying for this science teaching position in Folkestone, Kent please apply online today or call on 01732 373340, TimePlan the number one teaching agency for jobs in the south east.

Primary Teaching Job of the Day !!

Are you a Qualified Primary School Teacher looking for a February 2016 start in Kent?

TimePlan Education, working in partnership with their client school, is looking for an exceptional teacher to do PPA cover who has taught successfully across KS1 and KS2. The position is a full-time contract starting February 2016 and running until the summer term initially. The successful candidate must be committed to achieving high standards and able to inspire students across the ability range at primary level.

This Primary school situated on beautiful grounds was awarded Ofsted Outstanding in 2015. The school were able to achieve this because the students, staff and families work together to ensure there is a lively and nurturing learning environment. This happy school holds respect, joy, forgiveness and honesty as their core values


To be considered for this PPA cover vacancy based in Kent you will need to;
  • show you are an imaginative and forward thinking classroom practitioner.
  • have the willingness to form part of a successful and enthusiastic team.
  • support the school ethos at all times during your working days.
  • possess excellent teaching skills and an ability to lead classes with pace and sufficient challenge.
It is essential that you understand the school's academic standing and have a sincere commitment to sharing long-term aims.

In return we offer:
  • professional classroom support from our team of headteacher consultants throughout the length of your contract.
  • a dedicated key contact at the TimePlan South East office.
  • TimePlan South East teacher socials where you can meet teachers who are teaching at schools in your placement area.
  • opportunities to aid your professional development.
  • pay to scale.
If you are interested in applying for this PPA cover position in Kent, please apply online today or call on 01732 373340.
TimePlan are the number one teaching agency for jobs in the south east.

Monday, 18 January 2016

What's Wrong with Studying the Kardashians? By Meredith Jones

The Kardashian family

When you think of the Kardashians, is it Kim’s lauded bottom that comes to mind? Or Kris’s reputation as a controlling “momager”? Perhaps it’s something more nebulous, like the family’s reputation for being shallow and talentless; a view shared by the 500,000 people who signed a petition in 2012 to boycott the Kardashians and “bring back smarter TV”.
Back in November, I hosted Kimposium!; a symposium about all things Kardashian at Brunel University in London. The very idea of scholarly attention being given to the world’s most famous reality television family came under attack, especially on Twitter and other online forums.
In the lead up to the Kimposium I was interviewed several times for press and radio and each time was asked to justify the notion of taking the Kardashians seriously. I found myself wondering whether a symposium around, say, Bear Grylls, would have caused the same furore. I doubt it, because the broadcasting of Grylls’ overtly masculine set of skills and the cultural relevance of his labour as a professional wilderness survivor and adventurer seem go unquestioned, despite their irrelevance to the lives of most people.
Keeping Up with the Kardashians follows Kris Jenner and her five adult daughters as they deal with work, love, relationships and children: the programme is about quintessentially “feminine” concerns. In her book The Triumph of Reality TV: The Revolution in American Television, Leigh H Edwards notes that although the programme is “polarising, not least because of [its] obvious profit motive and manipulation … the engine that drives the connection to fans is the storytelling”.
This storytelling often emphasises the love and intimacy between the Kardashian women. In the first episode of the current series, a tearful Kris tells Kourtney, who is separating from her partner,“it breaks my heart to see you in pain”. The episode centres around the women working to protect each other’s emotional health in relation to both Kourtney’s separation and their stepfather Caitlyn Jenner’s gender transition.
Support is a word that is used repeatedly. Kim says: “I just have to balance out all the people and make everyone feel supported.” Younger sister Kendall adds: “I want to be supportive of my mom with what she’s going through.”
It has occurred to me that the hostility around the Kardashians may not be about their supposed shallowness or vanity, but the fact that there are hardly any men on the show — it is about highly successful women and their relationships with each other.
The discipline of popular culture studies is most criticised when it examines the lives of women, the creative work of women, and feminist issues. A black feminism course titled Feminist Perspectives: Politicising BeyoncĂ©, taught at Rutgers University in the US, was recently cancelled despite having been oversubscribed for years. In contrast, The Beatles, Popular Music and Society MA taught at Liverpool Hope University goes without comment.
The study of popular culture, from graffiti to hip-hop to reality television, can enhance philosophical, political and sociological discussions. At the Kimposium we talked about labour, death, respectability, the digital world, trauma and democracy, as well as the more predictable themes of gender, body image, beauty and race.
Popular culture can be used as a pathway into theoretical discussions because it is crucially connected to them, and the more we accept this intertwining, the better we will understand our world. Speaking to students in familiar cultural language is invaluable. But performers like Beyoncé and the Kardashians are important in their own right. These women artists are worthy of study for what they create, represent, and for the cultural texts and dialogues that they are part of.
Elizabeth Wissinger, a professor from the City University of New York , argued at the Kimposium that what the Kardashians do, or perform, is a prototypical feminine kind of labour — she calls it “glamour labour”. This is a form of work that many women (and some men) consciously or subconsciously undertake to some degree. It includes the daily toil of exercising, dieting, removing or adding hair, exfoliating, applying make up, dyeing hair, having cosmetic surgery, and so on and so on. Glamour labour points to the deep interest in the presentation of the body that has become central to cultures in all rich and many poorer parts of the world since the second half of the 20th century.
Watching Bear Grylls kill an alligator, drink his own urine or eat giant beetle larva is fascinating and entertaining. But watching the Kardashians conduct their daily, intimate, feminine lives, and seeing how they perform their glamour labour is more relevant.
Kim and her family won’t teach us how to survive in the wilderness, but they may give us insight into what it means to live in a world where image is crucial, and how to share intimacies and support each other as women in that world.
http://www.theguardian.com/higher-education-network/2016/jan/14/whats-wrong-with-studying-the-kardashians

Wednesday, 13 January 2016

Primary Teaching Job of the Day!!

Are you a Qualified Year 1 Teacher looking for a February 2016 start in Sussex?

TimePlan Education, working in partnership with their client school, is looking for a year 1 teacher who has taught successfully across key stage 1. The position is a full-time contract starting February 2016 and running until the summer break initially. The successful candidate must be committed to achieving high standards and able to inspire students across the ability range at KS1.

This 1 form entry primary school is very close to the exciting city of Brighton and Hove and boasts a happy, secure and caring environment where their students can blossom. This primary school is all inclusive and provides additional support and counselling for those learners who need it.
The school demands a high expectation from their students and teachers alike and aims to meet all the needs of the students by providing an enriched curriculum.
There is a lovely family atmosphere here where staff along with students enjoy working and learning closely together.

To be considered for this year 1 teaching vacancy based in Sussex you will need to:
  • show you are an imaginative and forward thinking classroom practitioner
  • have the willingness to form part of a successful and enthusiastic team
  • support the school ethos
  • possess excellent teaching skills and an ability to lead classes with pace and sufficient challenge
It is essential that you understand the school's academic standing and have a sincere commitment to sharing long-term aims

In return we offer:
  • professional classroom support from our team of headteacher consultants throughout the length of your contract.
  • a dedicated key contact at the TimePlan South East office.
  • TimePlan South East teacher socials where you can meet teachers who are teaching at schools in your placement area.
  • opportunities to aid your professional development.
  • pay to scale.
If you are interested in applying for this year 1 teaching position in Sussex, please apply online today or call on 01732 373 340.
TimePlan are the number one teaching agency for jobs in the south east.

My mum is a student at university too By Venetia Law


Venetia Law and her mother Claire sometimes proofread each other’s work. ‘As times goes by we’re learning more about each other.’


When I was in sixth form, my mother decided that she wanted to go to university. Of course I was happy for her. But then the doubt set in. Wouldn’t it be weird having a mum who was studying at the same time as me?
Other young people may have had to listen to family members reminisce about their experience of university, but it’s rare for a parent to choose to go to university alongside you.
There are contrasts: we study very different subjects – my mum tales psychology, while I opted for creative writing, so our experience varies in terms of content and assessment methods. And we aren’t at the same institutions: while my mum lives at home and studies at the University of South Wales, I moved away to attend Bath Spa University.
But at first it was still strange. My mum talks about her student friends and they are only slightly older than me. I was also used to my mum being around all the time, while now she has other commitments and everything has changed. It was hard to get used to, but we talked about it and told each other how we felt.
By being open we’ve learned what we want and need from each other. Sometimes that means just giving each other space. It’s nice to go home for the weekend and not worry about having to balance work and spending time with my mum. Now we can sit down together and study while catching up over tea and a biscuit.
I find that my mum’s awareness of university life can help because it means she knows and understands what I’m going through. It’s also great having a mother who knows what she wants, is passionate about her studies and is prepared to work hard to achieve her goals – it gives me motivation to do the same.
When siblings attend university at the same time, there can be competition, whereas when I think about my mum, I don’t worry about her getting a better grade than me. As a teenager it can be rare to feel like your mum truly understands you, so I appreciate that my mum does.

‘Sometimes she gets frustrated with me’: what it’s like for Venetia’s mother Claire

Starting university a year before Venetia gave me an insight into many of the challenges that students face. While I appreciate that the experience isn’t the same for everyone, my time at university gave me a level of knowledge that can only come from being a student. 
My experiences were fresh in my mind when Venetia started university, which meant I could offer advice and be helpful. However, sometimes she gets frustrated with me – I can see it in her face – when I explain how my university does things, as I’ve learned that sometimes hers does it differently.
The inital period was emotionally challenging. I think this may have happened when she went away to uni anyway, regardless of me being a student. My daughter was moving away from home for the first time – a life changing event for both of us. Learning about a new subject and facing deadlines only added to the pressure. 
The role of being both a mum and a student has been a learning experience, which I have now settled into. I would say that the strength we both share is that we can communicate effectively. This is beneficial whatever the circumstances. I am also very focussed, dedicated and comfortable with independent learning. I feel that we have reached a stage where we can share space, be engrossed in our own study material, and yet be supportive of each other if the need arises.


Tuesday, 12 January 2016

Secondary School Job of the Day !!!

English teaching job available in Cranbrook, Kent .
Are you a qualified English teacher looking for a teaching position starting at the beginning of next term?
TimePlan Education is working with this academy to recruit a keen and committed English teacher for a full time role commencing January 2016 and running to the end of the academic year in the first instance. Applications are welcomed from teachers at any stage of their teaching career, overseas teachers are also welcome to apply.

This is a thriving and successful co-educational 11 to 18 Secondary School in the Weald of Kent. It has an established record of excellent examination results and outstanding achievement. The school has gained specialist college status in sport, mathematics with ICT and vocational education.
High expectations are set for both behaviour and learning and students are always encouraged to strive for their best.

Does this English teaching job in Kent sound ideal for you?
All successful applicants must:
  • be able to deliver good and outstanding teaching practices as the norm
  • have experience teaching English in a secondary school
  • have a willingness to form part of a successful and enthusiastic team
  • be able to create an enriching, supportive and high performing learning environment
  • to support the school ethos
  • be an imaginative and forward thinking classroom practitioner
  • possess excellent teaching skills and an ability to lead classes with pace and sufficient challenge
It is essential that you understand the schools academic standing and have a sincere commitment to sharing long-term aims.

In return we offer:
  • pay to scale
  • professional classroom support from our team of Headteacher consultants throughout the length of your contract
  • a dedicated key contact at the South East office
  • TimePlan South East teacher socials where you can meet professional teachers from all over the planet who are teaching at schools in your placement area
  • opportunities to aid your professional development.
If you are interested in applying for this English teaching position please apply online today or call Paul Chuter on 01732 373340 at TimePlan, the number one teaching agency for English teaching jobs in Kent.

Primary School Job of the Day!!

Are you an Assistant Head Teacher with Classroom experience looking for a January 2016 start in Bexley?

TimePlan Education, working in partnership with their client school, is looking for an assistant head teacher who has also taught successfully in a primary setting. The position is a full-time contract starting January 2016 and running until the summer term initially. The successful candidate must be committed to achieving high standards and able to inspire students across all ability ranges.

This Bexley primary school values are Achievement, Responsibility, Respect and Happiness. These values underpin the school and help create an ethos with commitment to succeed, care for others and enjoyment at the core. It welcomes children from the age of 3 upwards. The school is a two form entry and is located less than 20 minutes from a mainline station that has routes from Central London. The school has many awards, such as 'Healthy School' and 'Eco School' that reflect its commitment to promoting healthy lifestyles and environmental awareness.

To be considered for this assistant head teacher vacancy based in Bexley you will need to;
  • show you are an imaginative and forward thinking classroom practitioner.
  • have the willingness to form part of a successful and enthusiastic team.
  • support the school ethos at all times during your working days.
  • possess excellent teaching skills and an ability to lead classes with pace and sufficient challenge.
It is essential that you understand the school's academic standing and have a sincere commitment to sharing long-term aims.

In return we offer:
  • professional classroom support from our team of headteacher consultants throughout the length of your contract.
  • a dedicated key contact at the TimePlan South East office.
  • TimePlan South East teacher socials where you can meet teachers who are teaching at schools in your placement area.
  • opportunities to aid your professional development.
  • pay to scale.
If you are interested in applying for this assistant head teacher position in Bexley, please apply online today or call on 01732 373340.

TimePlan are the number one teaching agency for jobs in the south east.

The Science of Resilience: How to Teach Students to Persevere By Judy Willis

Schoolboy playing with exploring a mechanical toy
In schools today, the focus is not only on helping students pass exams, but also on improving their character by making them more resilient. Resilience in learning, as in life, is about being able to persevere through setbacks, take on challenges and risk making mistakes to reach a goal.
Studies show that resilience has a positive influence on academic performance of undergraduates, as well as their social and emotional wellbeing.
It’s not always clear, however, how to develop more resilient students. I believe there are three main areas to focus on: a child’s competence, their tolerance to mistakes, and their ability to set goals. These components help young people to sustain effort even when a challenge seems too great.

Competence builds resilience

It is not uncommon for students to come to your class with past experiences that have left them feeling like they can’t move forward when a task is overwhelming. You can help them overcome that mindset by building their confidence through experiences that develop their competence.

One activity involves showing students that some things, which seem impossible or too confusing at first, can be broken down into easy-to-understand parts. Give groups of students broken (not repairable) clocks, watches, or safe (ie not sharp and unplugged) appliances or mechanical toys (eg a jack-in-the-box).

When each group has an item, first ask them to discuss how it might work. With objects of age-appropriate complexity, it is unlikely they will be confident in their initial ideas. Then invite them to take their object apart, without any requirement other than they must discover how it works. The object is to build their resilience to feeling overwhelmed by letting them discover, on their own, how complex things can be broken into parts.

The following questions and instructions might be useful (and you can modify them for your students’ age, ability and task):

1 Look at your object and discuss how it might work.
Now take it apart and look at what makes it work. Write down what you recognise, such as springs, screws, coils, gears, batteries or wiring.
3 When finished, write down any ideas about how the parts might work together.
When they’ve completed the task explain that children have just experienced their ability to break something down into more understandable parts.
The experience will build their competence awareness. Dividing big assignments or jobs into small tasks will give them the confidence to get started and the resilience to persevere. Invite groups to put their new awareness into mottos or posters for the classroom, for example: “By achieving one task after another, you’ll get the whole job done.”

Learning from failure


When you incorporate opportunities for students to experience mistakes as an expected part of learning, you build their resilience to setbacks. Through class discussions, your own mistakes, and building pupils’ knowledge of their brain’s programming, your students will gain the competence, optimism and understanding to persevere – and even make progress – through failure.
When students make mistakes, explain that these are not failures: they are opportunities for the brain to build a bridge that will bring them success in future. They need to understand that their brains have evolved to be survival tools: the brains of mammals in the wild adapted to make rapid decisions and choices in response to change or threat. Our human brains still have that primitive quick-response reaction to new situations – even to questions in a test. But because we are not out in the wild or in danger, instead of jumping to conclusions, we can take few seconds to be sure our brain’s first choice is the best.
More importantly, when you correct an error, your brain builds new wiring to guide you to make a better choice next time. So doing something wrong can actually be beneficial in the long-term, replacing misinformation with firm experience. The strongest understandings we have do not come from what we’ve memorised but rather from what we’ve learned from failure.

Other ways to help students see mistakes in a new light include:
 Discussing common errors made by previous students.
 Pointing out your own mistakes and acknowledging how you felt at the time. 
 Inviting your class to share their past mistakes and recognising they lived through them and can see them with the perspective of time and even humour now.

Personal meaning builds persistence

Students will engage more if they have to use the facts or procedures as tools for participating in personally relevant tasks.
One way to ensure this is by including appealing activities throughout the study unit. For example, invite students to select a recipe from a cookbook that uses standard and not metric measurements. They will want to know how to convert metric and standard measurements to make what they have chosen. The personally desirable goal of making delicious cookies or play dough will motivate them to do their sums.

Monday, 11 January 2016

Secondary School Job of the Day!!

English teaching job available in Cranbrook, Kent .
Are you a qualified English teacher looking for a teaching position starting at the beginning of next term?
TimePlan Education is working with this academy to recruit a keen and committed English teacher for a full time role commencing January 2016 and running to the end of the academic year in the first instance. Applications are welcomed from teachers at any stage of their teaching career, overseas teachers are also welcome to apply.

This is a thriving and successful co-educational 11 to 18 Secondary School in the Weald of Kent. It has an established record of excellent examination results and outstanding achievement. The school has gained specialist college status in sport, mathematics with ICT and vocational education.
High expectations are set for both behaviour and learning and students are always encouraged to strive for their best.

Does this English teaching job in Kent sound ideal for you?
All successful applicants must:
  • be able to deliver good and outstanding teaching practices as the norm
  • have experience teaching English in a secondary school
  • have a willingness to form part of a successful and enthusiastic team
  • be able to create an enriching, supportive and high performing learning environment
  • to support the school ethos
  • be an imaginative and forward thinking classroom practitioner
  • possess excellent teaching skills and an ability to lead classes with pace and sufficient challenge
It is essential that you understand the schools academic standing and have a sincere commitment to sharing long-term aims.

In return we offer:
  • pay to scale
  • professional classroom support from our team of Headteacher consultants throughout the length of your contract
  • a dedicated key contact at the South East office
  • TimePlan South East teacher socials where you can meet professional teachers from all over the planet who are teaching at schools in your placement area
  • opportunities to aid your professional development.
If you are interested in applying for this English teaching position please apply online today or call Paul Chuter on 01732 373340 at TimePlan, the number one teaching agency for English teaching jobs in Kent.

Primary School Job of the Day!

Are you a Qualified Reception Teacher looking for an April 2016 start in Kent?

TimePlan Education, working in partnership with their client school, is looking for a reception teacher. The position is a full-time contract starting after Easter 2016. The successful candidate must be committed to achieving high standards and able to inspire students in their early years of school.

This is a large Primary Academy in Bexley, it is part of a large and successful federation of schools across south east London. This trust has a long history of providing outstanding education to the students it caters for. This Bexley Academy has a split primary and secondary school and works closely with the local community. The school is a specialist technology academy and has excellent and modern facilities for all students. There is less than a 30 minute commute into Central London. For drivers, the school is around 2 miles from the M25 and within a close distance to the A2.


To be considered for this reception teaching vacancy based in Kent you will need to:
  • show you are an imaginative and forward thinking classroom practitioner
  • have the willingness to form part of a successful and enthusiastic team
  • support the school ethos at all times
  • possess excellent teaching skills and an ability to lead classes with pace and sufficient challenge
It is essential that you understand the school's academic standing and have a sincere commitment to sharing long-term aims.

In return we offer:
  • professional classroom support from our team of headteacher consultants throughout the length of your contract.
  • a dedicated key contact at the TimePlan South East office.
  • TimePlan South East teacher socials where you can meet teachers who are teaching at schools in your placement area.
  • opportunities to aid your professional development.
  • pay to scale.
If you are interested in applying for this reception teaching position in Kent, please apply online today or call on 01732 373340.
TimePlan are the number one teaching agency for jobs in the south east.

Want to Improve Teaching in Universities? Value those who Teach By Sally Hunt

The writing’s on the wall: the increasing use of casual contracts is a threat to teaching quality.
Everyone supports good teaching in our universities. How could we not? UK universities have a global reputation for the high quality of learning offered here – and they attract greater numbers of overseas students (14%) than any other country in the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, except the US (which hosts 21%).
Teaching is, at its core, a human endeavour and the fact that so many people want to study in this country is a tribute to the 200,000 staff who teach in our universities, as well as the thousands more who support them. Yet successive initiatives from the government seem to ignore the impact of this critical group, choosing instead to focus upon structures. Sadly, the proposed Teaching Excellence Framework (Tef), continues this pattern.
If the absence of the academic is striking in the Tef proposals, so too is the failure to appreciate how important the underlying employment model pursued by universities is in relation to quality.
More than 100,000 teaching staff (more than half of the total), are in insecure employment. The lucky ones have one-year contracts, tens of thousands more are on hourly paid contracts and 20,000 on some form of zero-hours contract. Thisendemic casualisation, is, in the words of one lecturer I met last week, “higher education’s dirty secret”.
Does it matter that those who teach our children at university are likely to be employed on a term-by-term basis, often living from hand-to-mouth and with little access to facilities or training and professional development?
The truth is that although there are many, many great teachers within the casualised workforce, their achievements are in spite of, rather than because of, the system that employs them. As one lecturer puts it: “The temporary nature of my work means that I lack the time not just to fulfil my academic and pastoral duties with students, but also to develop my own ideas or teaching style.”
The truth is that although there are many, many great teachers within the casualised workforce, their achievements are in spite of, rather than because of, the system that employs them. As one lecturer puts it: “The temporary nature of my work means that I lack the time not just to fulfil my academic and pastoral duties with students, but also to develop my own ideas or teaching style.”
The Tef is being consulted on until 15 January,but the outline for it provided in the green paper proposes using student satisfaction, student retention rates and graduate job prospects to measure teaching quality. Those that score highly in these measures will be allowed to raise tuition fees in line with inflation (which will eventually rise).
There’s a continuing lack of consensus about what constitutes sensible evidence for measuring teaching excellence but the student satisfaction survey is definitely not seen as a credible tool for the job.
There are methodological and pedagogical deficiencies with student satisfaction surveys. A UCU member who is an education lecturer in London told me that she has yet to find anyone who views the NSS as a valid measure of teacher effectiveness.
She pointed out that satisfaction is influenced by a whole host of factors, many of which are wider processes beyond their control, such as funding. Her department is struggling with a much-reduced budget after government reforms shifted teacher training to schools.
The marketisation of higher education has, of course, brought graduate prospects into sharp focus for students – now thought of as consumers. But making a direct link between post-study work and teaching is disingenuous. Choice of course, institution, and sadly, prior schooling and social background, are equally big predictors of job prospects for students.In addition, as an economics lecturer at a south coast university, said, the state of the economy has the biggest bearing on job prospects for her students.
The University College Union has long argued that the conditions teachers work in are effectively the conditions that students learn in. So although it is hidden away on page 33 of the green paper, the suggestion that universities should be held to account for career, staff training and engagement and the numbers of staff in permanent employment is one that we welcome.
As a union, we have made the case for the introduction of clear agreed promotion criteria for teaching staff, based on the national academic role profiles or locally agreed variants of them. Good teaching needs to be recognised in a clear career structure for university staff. I repeatedly hear from members that this is the obvious incentive to improve teaching, supported by appropriate training, support and professional development.